Regular Church Activities

The Church holds 2 regular Sunday services each month.

 

The Sunday services are at 11am:

  • 2nd Sunday each month - Morning Worship using Common Worship.
  • 4th Sunday each month - Holy Communion using Common Worship.
  • 5th Sunday will be a Benefice Service where members of all the Benefice churches worship together.

Between December and March each winter the field at Felbrigg becomes too muddy to allow safe travelling to and from the church across the fields.  During those winter months we welcome the congeregation from St Margaret's Felbrigg as they worship with us at  St Andrew's Metton.

 

While this is the normal pattern of services please refer to the "For your diary" page for the forthcoming services.

 
  • 5th Sunday will be a Benefice Service where members of all the Benefice churches worship together.
Roughton 

Roughton straddles the main A140 as it runs through the village.  The population is some 950.  Housing is mainly private but there are some houses which are let and some social housing. Roughton is the only village with a school.

This church is dedicated to St Mary, the Virgin.  It has a round tower dates from the Saxo-Norman period (late 11th Century).  The Decorative-period chancel has an elegant east window with reticulated tracery. This Church was much altered by the Victorians who reroofed it and changed a lot of the chancel.  The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.  The delightful stained-glass east window to the south aisle depicts the passage Matthew 25:35, “I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me”.

Our congregation is drawn from Roughton and surrounding villages with visitors swelling our numbers.  The church hosts the children of Roughton School several times a year.

 

We visit the school with "Open the Book" and to take regular assemblies.

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Bessingham 

Bessingham is the furthest parish from Roughton. It is a small village in a conservation area with a population of around 86 adults and 20 young people. The housing is mainly private housing with buildings of traditional brick and flint.

This church is dedicated to St Mary, the Virgin.  It has parts dating from the Saxon era (triangular bell openings) as well as the Norman era (the tower arch).  The round tower is probably one of the oldest in the county.  The stained-glass windows by Charles Kempe and J Powell & Son are particularly noteworthy.  The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.

Our congregation is small but faithful and drawn from the local villages.

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Felbrigg

The church is situated in the middle of the National Trust estate about 1½ miles from the village.  Historically the village was once near to the church in what is now the park, but it was moved after an outbreak of plague. Felbrigg is an old norse name meaning "plank bridge".

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This church is dedicated to St Margaret of Antioch.  It is a splendid church built by the de Felbrigg family in the early 1400s in the grounds of Felbrigg Hall. Their note-worthy brass sepulchre memorials are on the floor. The inside of the church retains its Georgian box-pews and elaborate marble monuments to the later family of the Hall – the Windhams.  The church was built when the estate was producing its own bricks to develop the main house.  The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.

Our congregation is drawn from the local area and many visitors to the area, on holiday in the district, walking Weavers's Way or visiting Felbrigg Hall. However, in the winter months the fields around the church get too muddy to allow safe passage.  We then join the congregation at Metton.

Hanworth with Gunton

Hanworth is unusual, its houses standing around a large grazed common; many of them holiday cottages or second homes. The major part of the parish which is combined with Gunton, lies within a conservation area and it is split by the A140.

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The church stands outside the village and is dedicated to St Bartholomew.  It has a large square stone font that stands on 4 stone pillars and pre-dates the 14th Century church. One distinguishing feature is that the church has no electricity, but boasts a pipe organ that requires the bellows to be pumped for use!

Hanworth

The major part of the parish which is combined with Gunton, lies within a conservation area and it is split by the A140.  Hanworth is unusual, its houses standing around a large grazed common; many of them holiday cottages or second homes. 

The church is dedicated to St Bartholomew.  It was all rebuilt in the early 15th century Perpendicular period which gave it a splendid square tower.  It replaced a smaller Norman church.  The tower still has its ring of bells on an ancient bell-frames (a rare survival).  In the nave, black-marble leger slabs are a memorial to the Doughty family of the Hall.  The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.

Gunton

This church is dedicated to St Andrew.  This is the only Grade 1, Listed Building in the group.  It was designed by the nationally famous architect Robert Adam and opened in Easter 1770. The quality of its proportioning surpasses anything that modern architects are able to achieve.  Taking the form of a Doric Temple, it has a prominent portico. The inside is laid out like a chapel as there are no aisles or chancel. The decorative plaster-work and joinery is outstanding – designed in a style that harks back to the previous Palladian style.  The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.

The church lies within Gunton Park just to the east of the A140 from Norwich to Cromer

The congregation is drawn from the local villages as well as visitors who are attracted to this church which has no electricity.  While that causes restrictions, we enjoy a pipe organ whose bellows have to be pumped.

Because the church is in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust, services are limited to Christmas, Easter and Harvest with baptisms, weddings and funerals when appropriate. 

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Metton

Metton is a small hamlet.  

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As Gunton, this church is also dedicated to St Andrew.  The square unbuttressed west tower of the early 14th century has an unusual feature in the passage underneath it at ground level giving access to the burial yard at the rear. The pre-Victorian organ has a Grecian style encasement.  Small, oval stained-glass panels from Belgium adorn the east window.  A constable’s truncheon is attached to the wall. The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.

The congregation is drawn from the local villages, and in the winter is enlarged when the congregation of Felbrigg join us when their church is too difficult to reach because of the muddiness of the fields around the church.

 

Sustead

Sustead is a small village of some 43 dwellings with a good community spirit.

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This church is dedicated to St Peter and St Paul.  The dark brown corner-stones of the building show this was a Norman Church.  The Y-tracery bell-openings to the round bell-tower indicate it was added in the 13th century. The tower is entered from the outside by a southern door rather than from the usual tower arch. The south porch has delightfully flamboyant tracery of the Decorative period.  Medieval graffiti can be seen on the opening jambs.  Medieval stained glass in the southern nave windows show angels playing musical instruments.  Victorian stained-glass in the chancel is also note-worthy.  The churchyard is still used for burials and the interment of ashes.

Our congregation is drawn from the village, supplemented by visitors, some attracted by our use of the Book of Common Prayer.

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